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Cricket Victoria Winter Classes - Webinar Week 3

Please find attached link to the Cricket Victoria Winter Classes - Webinar Week 3 https://drive.google.com/file/d/1IdMhiheHKnWpML7xRl-_H707JtxY6ofG/view?usp=sharing

Cricket Victoria Winter Classes - Webinar Week 2

Please find attached link to the Cricket Victoria Winter Classes - Webinar Week 2 https://drive.google.com/file/d/1eF9Z5OpkE6sWFAvU3KC3L5B1F76YsbPV/view?usp=sharing

Recipe for Umpiring Success

Recipe for Umpiring Success

ABOUT THE AUTHOR Richard Patterson is an Australian first class umpire. Internationally, he officiated one test match as third umpire in the match between Australia and the West Indies at the MCG in 2000. He also officiated four men's one day internationals as third umpire in 2001/2002 and three women's one day internationals in 2002 and 2012. Domestically, he officiated twenty two first class matches including three tour matches featuring the West Indies, England and India and twenty one List A matches. Off field, his contributions have been significant, particularly as a mentor to current Cricket Australia National Umpire panel members. Furthermore, he was the Cricket Victoria State Umpire manager from August 2013 to September 2017. He is currently the Cricket Australia Umpire Education Manager.

Cricket Victoria Winter Classes - Webinar Week 1

Please find attached link to the Cricket Victoria Winter Classes - Webinar Week 1 https://drive.google.com/file/d/1aW-ZDIhV-c_yk3N43clVNP0Ui-cdb25v/view?usp=sharing

Umpiring New Zealand v Australia

Umpiring New Zealand v Australia

ABOUT THE AUTHOR Glenn Schache is a legendary umpire and scorer from Northern Districts, New Zealand who currently resides in Melbourne, Australia. He officiated as an umpire in New Zealand from 2001-2012, officiating numerous club matches in the Counties Manukau Region and 35 district association games in the Northern Districts Region. Further, he officiated 2 Northern Districts A matches. He also officiated three National Club Championships in Auckland. He was a scorer in New Zealand from 1993-1998, scoring 50 district association games in Norther Districts Region, including one tour game (Northern Districts v England) in 1997. The highlight of his scoring career, was a test as the press scorer in 1997 in the test match between New Zealand and Sri Lanka. In 1999, he was the scorer in the one day international in the match between New Zealand and India. He is still providing statistics for the Counties Manuka District Association and is currently working on a project with Evan Watkin (former New Zealand umpire) to get all New Zealand district association scorecards online. In Melbourne, he has officiated 112 matches in Victoria Premier Cricket and holds heritage number 516. He has officiated 3 National Inclusion Championships and one National Blind Cricket Championship. He is a current committee member of the Victoria Cricket Association Umpires and Scorers Association (VCAUSA). Proudly, he has participated in three Crockett Shield matches (VCAUSA v SACUSA) winning two matches. His off field contribution to cricket has been equally impressive, recognised for the following awards: 2016 - Counties Manukau Cricket Association Service award;
2017 - Service to cricket award Northern Districts Cricket; 2019 - Life member of the Counties Manukau Cricket Association When Phil asked me to write this piece, my mind immediately went back to when I met him. This momentous meeting of the minds occurred in April of 2011 at Cornwall Park in Auckland. Cornwall Park is one of the many beautifully scenic grounds around New Zealand. It is nestled at the base of the volcano Maungakiekie or One Tree Hill. The park is home (funnily enough) to the Cornwall Cricket Club which, as some of you know, holds the annual NZ National Cricket Club Championships. This week-long tournament brings the best six clubs from around Aotearoa to Cornwall Park, one club from each major association. Cricket Victoria has been sending umpires to this tournament on exchange for many years. I had been coming up the road from my base in Counties Manukau to participate for a few years, as had my colleague Ash Mehtora. The first time I met Phil it was raining, which is certainly not unusual for this time of year in Auckland. We got to discussing the tournament and Phil asked me if grounds in NZ were always like this. I think the picture above highlights what he meant. The umpire from the top game is at wide mid off for the bottom game! Certainly, in this tournament you must keep an eye and an ear on the action behind you! The whole cricket ground is about 10 acres in size and was the site of an olive grove until the 1950’s. As the diagram below shows, the cricket club fit three senior pitches and 18 junior pitches into this area. This makes for some big hitting during the club champs, especially if the game is on the 3rd senior pitch. The straight boundary at the bottom end is very short and a lot of time is spent fetching the ball from the neighbouring hospital’s car park! I remember one year the McCullum brothers having an absolute feast playing for Green Island. The answer to Phil’s question is “Yes”, most grounds in NZ try to fit two or three pitches in. This highlights one of the biggest differences I have found between cricket in NZ and Melbourne – the size & condition of the grounds. We are extremely fortunate here in Melbourne that most Premier Cricket grounds are dedicated to cricket and host one game per oval. In my first season here in 2012 was spent marvelling at the standard of the pitches, grounds and club rooms. Grounds like Dandenong, Geelong, Northcote and Ringwood were superb and steeped in history. A newer ground was Casey Fields where the ovals were immaculate. All firsts & seconds grounds have dedicated staff that ensure the standard is kept very high. Back home in Counties Manukau, just south of Auckland, the story had been a lot different. It is a mostly country based area and, of the 6 Premier clubs, only one had a dedicated cricket oval. The others shared facilities with the winter codes of rugby or soccer. Most of the time, this meant an uneven outfield. Most first grounds would have decent size boundaries but there was usually a game on next to it. The club rooms and changing facilities were of differing standards too but were structured for the winter codes. Ground staff are council employed and cover multiple grounds which can lead to under prepared pitches. A big difference between the two counties, especially early in the season, is the weather. October is wet in both, but usually worse in NZ. The first 3 or 4 rounds are limited over games played on artificial pitches, if they go ahead at all. Grass pitches are not played on until November. Later in the season, the hottest us Kiwis have to handle is 28-30 rather than 40-42 in Melbourne. I had never experienced anything like the cool change that swept across Camberwell and dropped the temperature by 10 degrees in half an hour! As there were only a few umpires in our region, we often umpired on our own – even at Premier level. I know sub-association umpires here must do the same so know how tiring that can be. We umpires carried our own stumps to games so what a pleasure it is not to have to carry a golf bag full of stumps around! Only having 6 premier teams means you know everyone, and they know you! You are umpiring guys who you played with and against. This presents a challenge to not relax too much and stick to your guns when needed. It can be a good thing too, when you get to know how the players react to varying situations. Having many more players in Melbourne means most of us will only umpire the same team 2 or 3 times a year rather than 2 or 3 times a month! There are many differences, yes, but also many similarities. Of course, cricket is cricket, the laws are the laws and players are still players. They will dispute decisions they don’t like regardless of the accuracy of the decisions. Captains will always mark you down if you give them out LBW :-). My first umpiring coach would always say that 20 years on, you could tell who won the game by the umpiring report. There is a lot more structure in Premier Cricket around discipline, and more support for the umpires, but behaviour is about the same in both countries – mostly good! The camaraderie of umpiring is certainly the same. As umpires, we always enjoy socialising with other umpires. Indeed, this can be the best way to talk about what works and what doesn’t in certain situations. Top class umpires are, for the most part, always willing to share their experiences with less experienced colleagues. Counties Manukau enjoys a very good name in umpiring, with several first-class umpires and a couple of test umpires from the area. Tony Hill was not far off a test umpire when I started umpiring and he gave all of us very good advice over the years. It was great a few years ago to meet him in Melbourne as he stood in a Boxing Day test. I have been lucky to be involved in two great tournaments that really exemplify the camaraderie. In NZ, there is a limited overs tournament for the six Northern Districts district associations. Six or seven umpires from the ND area spent three days together. I got to stand with first class and test umpires, including Steve Dunne, who, of course, was at the other end when Darrell Hair took a dislike to Muttiah’s bowling action. Many thoughts and opinions were swapped in post-match reviews and continued over dinner later in the evening. Lots of first class players participate in this tournament so the standard is always high. Over in Geelong, I have been privileged to be involved at the National Inclusion champs. Umpiring blind, deaf and ID players brings a new challenge, one which is great to share with several other umps living in the same facility for a week. We have had lots of lively discussions about playing conditions, Big Bash cricket, what shirts we are wearing and wine & food!! Having first class umpires there is invaluable to all of us, especially the less experienced ones. In summary, there will always be similarities and differences wherever this great game of ours is played. I feel privileged to have been fortunate to stand in the games I have with the colleagues that I have stood with. From Whangarei to Gisborne, from Geelong to Sale and a lot of places in between, cricket has always been the winner!!!

Stumped - One Cricket Umpire, Two Countries

Stumped - One Cricket Umpire, Two Countries

Who in their right mind would want to be cricket umpire? This is the question Premier Cricket Umpire Richard Harrison poses in his recently released book; Stumped - One Cricket Umpire, Two Countries. Stumped is a delightful and very funny memoir that charts the author’s ‘entirely unplanned journey into cricket umpiring,’ while he was living in the village of Sevenoaks, Kent. He attends his first training course at the local rugby club, sits his first exam and makes his debut in a pre-season village friendly. The following year he progresses to the Kent League (umpiring matches each Saturday) while he launches a playing career (on Sundays) with a nearby village team, after a twenty year absence from the game. He returns to Australia six years later, where he now umpires some of the world’s best female cricketers in Victoria’s Premier Cricket Competition. Stumped is a wonderful and very entertaining book. It is packed with hilarious anecdotes, incidents and experiences from a career that so far spans fifteen years and two countries. We meet some tremendous characters along the way and visit some of the most beautiful and picturesque cricket grounds in the world, in a book that throughout celebrates the most wonderful, complex and historic game there is. As the author himself concludes in the book’s Foreword - ‘Lest anyone be in any doubt, consider this; Games have rules. Cricket has laws.’ Stumped is available as an eBook, Paperback (and soon an Audio Book) from Amazon; https://www.amazon.com.au/dp/B0898LV2DF Thanks to the Victoria Cricket Association Umpires and Scorers Association for graciously sharing this article.

Pink Cricket Balls May Be Visually Challenging at Sunset

Pink Cricket Balls May Be Visually Challenging at Sunset

ABOUT THE AUTHOR Joshua Adie is a cricket umpire on the 1st Grade Panel in Brisbane, Queensland. Joshua is also a PhD candidate at QUT in the School of Exercise & Nutrition Sciences. His research explores how elite-level cricket umpires make LBW decisions, and hopes to translate the findings of his research into evidence based training programs for grassroots umpires as well as further develop umpires at the top level. Joshua is interested in general decision-making of sports officials, heuristics & biases, and gaze behaviours of elite performers. Please click on the following link to read Joshua's paper. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/2041669516687049

Where to Stand -  A Cricket Umpires Guide

Where to Stand - A Cricket Umpires Guide

ABOUT THE AUTHOR Richard Patterson is an Australian first class umpire. Internationally, he officiated one test match as third umpire in the match between Australia and the West Indies at the MCG in 2000. He also officiated four men's one day internationals as third umpire in 2001/2002 and three women's one day internationals in 2002 and 2012. Domestically, he officiated twenty two first class matches including three tour matches featuring the West Indies, England and India and twenty one List A matches. Off field, his contributions have been significant, particularly as a mentor to current Cricket Australia National Umpire panel members. Furthermore, he was the Cricket Victoria State Umpire manager from August 2013 to September 2017. He is currently the Cricket Australia Umpire Education Manager.

TEAMWORK

TEAMWORK

ABOUT THE AUTHOR Claire Polosak is a member of the ICC Development Panel. She is the first female to officiate a men's one day international, when she stood in the match between Namibia and Oman in April 2019. Internationally, she has officiated 17 women's one day internationals and 33 women's T20 internationals. Domestically, in October 2017 in the match between NSW and CA XI she became the first female to officiate an Australian domestic List A match, having officiated 3 in total. She has officiated a further 20 women's T20 domestic matches and 13 men's domestic T20 matches as the 3rd umpire. Claire has also stood in the following ICC tournaments: ICC Women’s T20 World Cup Qualifies | Bangkok | November – December 2015 ICC Women’s T20 World Cup | India | March 2016 ICC Women’s World Cup Qualifies | Sri Lanka | February 2017 ICC Women’s World Cup | United Kingdom | June – July 2017 ICC women’s T20 World Cup Qualifies | Netherlands | July 2018 ICC Women’s T20 World Cup | West Indies | November 2018 ICC World Cricket League Division Two (Men) | Namibia | April 2019 ICC Under 19 World Cup Qualifies (Men) | Japan | June 2019 ICC Women’s T20 World Cup Qualifies | Scotland | August – September 2019 ICC Women’s T20 World Cup | Australia | March 2020 Claire's contribution off field is equally impressive in her role as Umpire Educator/ Female Umpire Engagement with Cricket New South Wales, where she is fortunate to be working with the rest of the umpiring team at Cricket New South Wales to increase the numbers of females taking up the best seat in the middle. In NSW in 2019/20, there were 286 umpiring appointments filled by females, 152 of these were in Premier Cricket. Teamwork. That elusive beast that ensures sports officials a smoother ride. Like most aspects to umpiring and officiating, work you put in before the game starts ensures that the game will (hopefully) be more straightforward to manage. Some people are naturally more inclined to be effective team members, teamwork is often an invisible aspect to our own personality and character. Like anything else in life, teamwork is a skill that can be improved through consistent practice and mindfulness. For me, the first aspect of teamwork is to check your ego at the door. The old saying, of “There is no ‘I’ in team” is so true when looking at the role of the sports official and how we go about our business. When you step out onto the field, you want to know that your partner has got your back no matter what happens. This leads to a deep, sometimes unsaid understanding that you will both do what you can to ensure you BOTH have a good day. In Cricket, fortunately under the Laws, we are meant to work with someone. While in some competitions, umpires officiate by themselves, there is no doubt that umpiring with another person should be much more effective than going it solo. In umpiring, particularly Premier (Club) Cricket, teamwork starts well before you arrive at the ground. It is customary to phone your partner a couple of days before the match to discuss a variety of logistical arrangements for the weekend. Things like: - Time of game - Time of arrival - The type of game (One Day, 2 day, T20) you will be involved with - If you know of any particular characteristics of players in the team/s - What shirt you are planning on wearing, both to the ground as well as on field. - Anything else that may be relevant to the game, for example do you know of any sneaky carparking spots at the ground you are heading to. While discussing the shirt you are planning on wearing to the ground and on field may appear both simple and also controlling, turning up to the ground in the same attire creates a strong first impression to the two teams playing the game, that there is indeed a third team there to participate for the day. You only get one first impression. While wearing the same shirt on field is a requirement of the game that you are involved in. For me, Teamwork can then be split into different segments, depending on the time or aspect of the game. I have split them up below for more targeted discussion. Before game - If you arrive at the ground before your partner, do not go out to the middle of the ground before your partner gets there. Even if there is weather around. This is possibly one of the biggest faux pas in umpiring. Just do not do it. We are a team, we head out to the ground as a team. IF you are at the ground before your partner, and a member of the playing team say something about the condition of the ground, be polite, but firm. “Thanks for the information, I’ll have a look when _______ gets here”. - Spend the time you have with your partner to discuss the Playing Conditions that are going to be used. This is the time where if either of you have a difference in understanding that you can check the book without the added stress of captains looking over your shoulder. - Also spend time with your partner working through aspects of the day that will make both of your days better, these may include, but are not limited to: o Any signals that you are planning on using during the game o How do you show at square leg that the ball has hit the bat/ body/ missed everything? o When will you be crossing/ not crossing for a L/R hand combination? o When are you going to update the captain on their over rates during the game o What are you going to talk to the captains about during the toss? - After the toss with the captains, don’t forget the other members of the third team- the Scorers, particularly if you are lucky enough to have dedicated scorers, as opposed to players who are sharing the scoring duties. Scorers need to know who has won the toss and who is batting/ bowling. It could also be a good idea to also mention any of the breaks/ drinks in play there will be. During game - Eye contact between the pair of you is incredibly important, and in many respects can prevent any trouble brewing. Eye contact between each delivery is important, and is crucial for communicating with your partner. - If you provide a warning to either team (eg. Bowler in the protected area), make sure you pass that information on to not only the fielding captain, but also your partner as the warning applies to both ends- this is important information to share. - Make sure you use the signals you agreed on before the game at the various times during the game. - Never comment to a player about a decision your partner has made. This is never regarded well by either team. A deflection comment may help here “I’m not in the best position to see” - In the interval I will often ask partners, particularly partners whom I have not stood with before/ very often, if there is anything we would like to do differently for the next session. This allows the opportunity for any changes to be made to ensure the following session of play is even better. - Walk on, and off the field together. If there is any hospitality at the ground (lunch, tea for example) head to the canteen/ clubhouse together. During Ground, Weather and Light (AKA GWL) - As Cricket is played in Summer, we can go for multiple games, or even seasons when our games are not affected by bad weather. When there is bad weather it is time to really be a team and work together when assessing the ground and the suitability of play, always within the laws and playing conditions! - When inspecting the conditions of the ground after rain, always do so together. - When speaking to the captains about any concerns that you have with the ground, the changing parameters of the game, it is easy for the “more experienced” umpire to dominate the conversations with the captains. It may be useful to deliberately take it in turns in speaking with the captains. - Before you do speak with the captains, working out a ‘script’ of the message that you are wanting to convey to the captain may assist you when speaking After game - When the day or game is over, spend some time relaxing with your team member - you have (hopefully) just had a great day! - This is a time to debrief with your partner about the day, have a casual chat about how the day went, what could be done differently and how you can both improve for next time. - In some competitions there is a post match meeting between the captains, the umpires as well as a facilitator, this can be a valuable opportunity to receive feedback from the captains involved in the game. Listen respectfully to the feedback, no matter what you think about the feedback you are receiving. - When providing feedback to your umpiring colleague, ensure that it is done respectfully and from the opinion of improving for both your partner and you. Remember the point about checking your ego at the door? I personally only share any feedback that I have, if I have been asked by my partner. I also make sure I share positive things they did throughout the day as well as anything constructive that I want to share as well. For me, teamwork comes down to what sort of person I would want to spend the day with, and I do my best to stick to those values. You will always find other umpires who you don’t click with, and possibly wouldn’t spend any social time with, however, it is all about being professional at all levels of Cricket, to ensure you can both get the job done to the best of your ability. What tips do you have for teamwork when umpiring? What characteristics have you seen in other umpires that exhibit great teamwork? Please leave your comments below.

Cricket Victoria Winter Classes - Webinar Laws 31 - 42

Please find attached the link to the Cricket Victoria Winter Classes - Webinar 2 Laws 31 - 42 https://drive.google.com/file/d/1hGwkiGTWFypJTRzNq8bnYEKdRe4YpOxk/view?usp=sharing

Cricket Victoria Winter Classes - Webinar Laws 1 to 30

Please find attached the link to the Cricket Victoria Classes - Webinar 1 Laws 1 to 30 https://drive.google.com/file/d/1yPVkuITMWPmLBWGEPk7N8db9XvO8kdXt/view?usp=sharing

When in doubt it's not out: LBW decision making across match types.

When in doubt it's not out: LBW decision making across match types.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR Joshua Adie is a cricket umpire on the 1st Grade Panel in Brisbane, Queensland. Joshua is also a PhD candidate at QUT in the School of Exercise & Nutrition Sciences. His research explores how elite-level cricket umpires make LBW decisions, and hopes to translate the findings of his research into evidence based training programs for grassroots umpires as well as further develop umpires at the top level. Joshua is interested in general decision-making of sports officials, heuristics & biases, and gaze behaviours of elite performers. Please click on the following link to read Joshua's paper. https://psyarxiv.com/2e6qh/